May 242017
 

In my interactive haunted house story, I have several endings where the reader is given the opportunity to join the house as a resident. This means they essentially become a monster in the house, ready to molest and terrorize new people coming in. I did something similar in my interactive UFO book where the aliens recognize that the reader is just as big of a pervert as they are, so they invite the reader to help them abduct and probe other races.

I like this kind of ending a lot. I have done it many times in my regular writing, especially the magical stories. That kind of ending casts the story in a new light. Instead of just being adventures, you understand that it is more of an initiation. By the end of the story, the main character, and in part the reader, is invited to become the story.

Even though I have been writing these kinds of endings for years, I only now realize where the inspiration came from. It is the movie, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. If you have never seen the movie, Charlie is a poor kid who wins a lifetime supply of chocolate and a trip to Wonka’s famous factory. Charlie is asked by Wonka’s rival to steal a sample of top-secret candy in exchange for untold wealth.  Charlie goes to the factory, encounters many wonderful mysterious things, watches other kids get eliminated one by one for their greed, steals the candy because hey, Charlie is dirt poor but then because of a minor transgression, loses the lifetime supply of chocolate. Now this is a big deal because Charlie’s family is so poor that the chocolate might be the only steady meal that the kid gets but instead of cashing out with Wonka’s rivals, Charlie returns the candy to Wonka because Charlie is the Best Kid Ever. That is when Wonka reveals that IT WAS ALL A TEST and now Charlie is his new heir and will now inherit the chocolate factory and live happily ever after.

Yep, I have been copying the end of this movie ever since. As a Poor-but-Good kid, this movie really impacted me. I realize that I have been giving away chocolate factories to characters and readers ever since.

Oh well. It is a good story to steal.

  One Response to “You Know What Happened to the Kid Who Got Everything He Ever Wanted?”

  1. Um, those choices in an online format could make for a very interesting sociological study. Consider different genres of IF / choose-your-own-adventure. With a bit of demographic information… hmm…

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